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Data Privacy and Security Handbook – 2018 Edition

Bryan Cave Partner David Zetoony has just published the 2018 Edition of the Data Privacy and Security Handbook: A Practical Guide for In House Counsel.

Five years ago few legal departments were concerned with – let alone focused on – data privacy or security. Most of those that were aware of the terms assumed that these were issues being handled by IT, HR, or marketing departments.

The world has changed. Data privacy class action litigation has erupted and data security breaches dominate the headlines. It is now well accepted that data privacy and data security issues threaten the reputation, profitability, and, sometimes, the operational survival of organizations. It is therefore perhaps not surprising to find that in almost every survey conducted of boards and senior management, data issues rank as one of their three top concerns, if not their single greatest concern. With that backdrop, organizations increasingly look to general counsel to manage data privacy and security risks.

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Do you get Bragging Rights if the Malware Infecting your Computer was Named after Zeus?

Over the last decade as the specter of cyber attacks has increased dramatically, financial institutions have been encouraged to look into the use of cyber fraud insurance as one means of minimizing risk. A recent decision by the 8th Circuit provides an interesting opportunity to see how such policies are going to be interpreted by the courts.

In 2011, an employee at Bellingham State Bank in Minnesota initiated a wire transfer through the Federal Reserve’s FedLine Advantage Plus system (FedLine). Wire transfers were made through a desktop computer connected to a Virtual Private Network device provided by the Federal Reserve. In order to complete a wire transfer via FedLine, two Bellingham employees had to enter their individual user names, insert individual physical tokens into the computer, and type in individual passwords and passphrases. In this instance the employee initiated the wire by inputting the passwords both for herself and the other employee and inserted both of the physical tokens. After initiating the wire the employee left the two tokens in the computer and left it running overnight. Upon returning the next day the employee discovered that two unauthorized wire transfers had been made from Bellingham’s Federal Reserve account to two different banks in Poland. Kirchberg was unable to reverse the transfers through the FedLine system. Kirchberg immediately contacted the Federal Reserve and requested reversal of the transfers, but the Federal Reserve refused. The Federal Reserve, however, did contact intermediary institutions to inform them that the transfers were fraudulent, and one of the intermediary institutions was able to reverse one of the transfers. The other fraudulent transfer was not recovered.

Bellingham promptly notified BancInsure of the loss and made a claim under their financial institution bond which provided coverage for losses caused by such things as employee dishonesty and forgery as well as computer system fraud. After an investigation, it was determined that a “Zeus Trojan horse” virus had infected the computer and permitted access to the computer for the fraudulent transfers. BancInsure denied the claim based on several exclusions in the policy including employee-caused loss exclusions, exclusions for theft of confidential information, and exclusions for mechanical breakdown or deterioration of a computer system. In essence, the policy does not cover losses whose proximate cause was employee negligence or a failure to maintain bank computer systems. Bellingham contested the denial and brought suit in federal court for breach of contract.

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What Will The Proposed New York Cybersecurity Requirements For Financial Institutions Really Make Companies Do?

In early September 2016, the New York Department of Financial Services (“DFS”) proposed a set of data security regulations (the “Proposal”) that would govern financial institutions, banks, and insurance companies subject to the jurisdiction of the agency (“covered entities”).  After receiving public comments, DFS revised and resubmitted the Proposal on December 28, 2016.  If the Proposal ultimately goes into effect it would require that covered entities have a written information security policy (“WISP”) and outline specific provisions (substantive and procedural) that must be contained in that document.  While the Proposal has garnered a great deal of public attention, the majority of the provisions in the latest version are not unique.

Prior to the Proposal at least four states already required that if a company collected financial information about consumers within their jurisdiction some, or all, of the company’s security program must be reduced to writing; three states required that an employee be specifically designated to maintain a security program.  More importantly, the Federal Gramm Leach Bliley Act (“GLBA”) contains broad requirements that mimic many of the Proposals provisions.  This includes, for example, the requirement that a financial institution conduct a risk assessment and maintain data breach response procedures.

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FDIC Examinations and Cyberattack Risk

FDIC bank examinations generally include a focus on the information technology (“IT”) systems of banks with a particular focus on information security. The federal banking agencies issued implementing Interagency Guidelines Establishing Information Security Standards (Interagency Guidelines) in 2001. In 2005, the FDIC developed the Information Technology—Risk Management Program (IT-RMP), based largely on the Interagency Guidelines, as a risk-based approach for conducting IT examinations at FDIC-supervised banks. The FDIC also uses work programs developed by the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) to conduct IT examinations of third party service providers (“TSPs”).

The FDIC Office of the Inspector General recently issued a report evaluating the FDIC’s capabilities regarding its approach to evaluating bank risk to cyberattacks. The FDIC’s supervisory approach to cyberattack risks involves conducting IT examinations at FDIC-supervised banks and their TSPs; staffing IT examinations with sufficient, technically qualified staff; sharing information about incidents and cyber risks with regulators and authorities; and providing guidance to institutions. The OIG report determined that the FDIC examination work focuses on security controls at a broad program level that, if operating effectively, help institutions protect against and respond to cyberattacks. The program-level controls include risk assessment, information security, audit, business continuity, and vendor management. The OIG noted, however, that the work programs do not explicitly address cyberattack risk.

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