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SBA PPP Eligibility Requirements

The SBA has made clear that businesses with 500 or fewer employees can apply for PPP funds, with certain exceptions. The number of employees for a business is generally determined by the average number of people employed for each pay period over the business’s latest 12 calendar months. For this determination, any person on the payroll must be included as one employee regardless of hours worked or temporary status.

However, for businesses with greater than 500 employees, there are still three possible ways qualify for PPP funds. This post analyzes the three additional methods for a business to qualify for PPP funds, based on the latest guidance from the SBA as of April 15, 2020.

Method 1: SBA Employee-Based Size Standards

Under the CARES Act, the SBA requires borrowers to have 500 or fewer employees or the number of employees specified per the SBA’s Size Standards table. Thus, a business with greater than 500 employees may still be eligible if it meets applicable SBA employee-based size standards for its primary industry. A business’s primary industry is denoted by its North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code. A list of all NAICS codes is available here.

For example, a business in the in the primary industry of natural gas extraction (NAICS Code 211130) with 1,000 employees would still be eligible for PPP funds because the applicable SBA employee-based size standard is 1,250.

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SBA PPP April 14 Interim Final Rule Guidance

On April 14, 2020, the SBA published an interim final rule that provides additional guidance regarding topics of confusion among both Payroll Protection Program (“PPP”) lenders and borrowers. This new rule supplements the first interim final rule, which was issued by the SBA on April 2, 2020, and specifically addresses the eligibility of self-employed individuals, partnerships, director-owned businesses, and legal gambling businesses. This post covers the updates detailed in the new interim final rule, based on the latest guidance from the SBA as of April 16, 2020.

Self-Employed Individuals

Eligibility

The new interim final rule makes clear that an individual may be eligible for a PPP loan if the individual:

  1. was in operation as a business on February 15, 2020;
  2. is an individual with self-employment income (such as an independent contractor or a sole proprietor);
  3. has a principal place of residence in the United States; and
  4. filed or will file a Form 1040 Schedule C for 2019.

The SBA has communicated that it will issue additional guidance for those individuals with self-employment income who: (i) were not in operation in 2019 but who were in operation on February 15, 2020, and (ii) will file a Form 1040 Schedule C for 2020.

We note that individuals should be aware that participation in the PPP may affect eligibility for state-administered unemployment compensation or unemployment assistance programs.

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PPP: Affiliation Guidelines

PPP: Affiliation Guidelines

April 9, 2020

Authored by: Jim Havel and Robert Klingler

In determining eligibility under the Paycheck Protection Program, the SBA will aggregate “affiliates” of the borrower. This post further explores what the SBA considers “affiliate” of the borrower, based on the latest guidance from the SBA as of April 9, 2010.

How does the SBA Define “Control” for Aggregation Purposes?

The SBA’s standard definition of “control” for affiliation and aggregation purposes is a facts-heavy analysis similar to a totality of the circumstances standard. The SBA generally goes as high up and across the ultimate ownership group and its controlled companies when it comes to the entity deemed to control for aggregation/ affiliation purposes.

Control is both affirmative and negative best understood through use of examples:

  • For examples of affirmative control, see all of the tests below.
  • For examples of negative control, see Example 3 of Test 1 below.

Four tests will generally apply for affiliation based on control for PPP Loans.

Test 1 – Affiliation based on ownership:

Example 1 – Equity control: The classic and easiest example to understand is equity control. If an entity controls a majority of the equity (50%+1) of another business (or multiple businesses), the SBA will aggregate all of the employees of those companies together under PPP.

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