Our Bryan Cave-affiliated sister site, the BC Retail Law Blog, recently published two posts that may be of interest to our banking, fintech and payments clients.

In “Bans on Credit Card Surcharges Face First Amendment Challenges,” the Retail Law Blog looks at how state laws that prohibit retailers from charging customers a surcharge for using a credit card are being challenged on First Amendment grounds.

For more than four decades, California’s Song-Beverly Credit Card Act of 1971 prohibited retailers from charging credit card customers such a surcharge. In Italian Colors Restaurant, et al. v. Harris, 99 F.Supp.3d 1199 (E.D. Cal. 2015), a federal judge ruled that the law unconstitutionally limits retailers’ freedom of speech. The California attorney general appealed, and the case is set for oral argument before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals on August 17.

One consequence of these actions may be to make credit cards more expensive to the consumer, which, in turn, could encourage further development of alternative forms of payment.

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