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The Misconceptions of Private Bank M&A

Last week, Kevin Strachan joined me in the podcast studio to discuss the ability of privately held banks to use their securities as consideration to acquire another institution.

Sadly, since the last time we recorded a podcast, the patriarch of our banking practice, Walt Moeling, passed away.  Our previously posted memorial included several links to remember Walt, but of particular relatedness to the podcast, we encourage everyone to listen again to two earlier podcasts with Walt sharing his wisdom.  In December 2016, Walt joined us on the podcast to discuss, among other things, the future of the banking industry and what one regulatory change he would make if given unlimited power. Then, in March 2017, Walt spoke about establishing a sustainable sales culture.

Somehow, I was able to read the notes I had scribbled about Walt, and we then continued to discuss two common (and contradictory) misconceptions on private company merger and acquisition activity. 

The first misconception is that privately held companies can’t issue stock as merger consideration.  The second misconception is that privately held companies can issue stock without restriction as merger consideration.  We regularly hear both of these misconceptions when advising private companies on a potential merger transaction where they are looking to issue (or receive) private company stock.  While neither of these ideas are correct, the truth is messy and usually requires further discussion.

Among the topics covered with Kevin in this episode of The Bank Account are:

  • the additional flexibility of banks without holding companies (and the limitations of that flexibility);
  • SEC registration via merger;
  • Regulation A+ in mergers;
  • the state Fairness Hearing exemption; and
  • using Rule 506 of Regulation D to issue securities to the target shareholders.

For private companies considering an acquisition of another institution, further conversations with investment bankers and lawyers are almost certainly going to be needed, but this episode of The Bank Account can give you a head start in understanding some of the potential options that may be out there.

Please click to subscribe to the feed on iTunes, Android, Email or MyCast. It is also now available in the iTunes and Google Play searchable podcast directories.

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Employee Stock Ownership Plans: Another Tool for Family-Owned Banks

Today’s economy presents numerous challenges to community bank profitability—compressed net interest margins, increased regulation, and management teams fatigued by the crisis. In response to these obstacles, many boards of directors are exploring new ways to reduce expenses, retain qualified management teams, and offer opportunities for liquidity to current shareholders short of a sale or merger of the institution.

For many family-owned banks, their deep roots in the community and a desire to see their banks thrive under continued family ownership into future generations can cause these challenges to be felt even more acutely. In particular, recruiting and retaining the “next generation” of management can be difficult. Cash compensation is often not competitive with the compensatory packages offered by publicly-traded institutions, and equity awards for management officials are unattractive given the limited liquidity of the underlying stock. All the while, these institutions should ensure that their owners have reasonable assurances of liquidity as needs arise or as investment preferences change. In combination, these challenges can often overwhelm a family-owned bank’s desire to remain independent.

Depending on the condition of the institution, implementing an employee stock ownership plan, or ESOP, may help a board address many of these challenges. While the ESOP is first a means of extending stock ownership to the institution’s employees, an ESOP can have other applications for family-owned banks.

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