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Do you get Bragging Rights if the Malware Infecting your Computer was Named after Zeus?

Over the last decade as the specter of cyber attacks has increased dramatically, financial institutions have been encouraged to look into the use of cyber fraud insurance as one means of minimizing risk. A recent decision by the 8th Circuit provides an interesting opportunity to see how such policies are going to be interpreted by the courts.

In 2011, an employee at Bellingham State Bank in Minnesota initiated a wire transfer through the Federal Reserve’s FedLine Advantage Plus system (FedLine). Wire transfers were made through a desktop computer connected to a Virtual Private Network device provided by the Federal Reserve. In order to complete a wire transfer via FedLine, two Bellingham employees had to enter their individual user names, insert individual physical tokens into the computer, and type in individual passwords and passphrases. In this instance the employee initiated the wire by inputting the passwords both for herself and the other employee and inserted both of the physical tokens. After initiating the wire the employee left the two tokens in the computer and left it running overnight. Upon returning the next day the employee discovered that two unauthorized wire transfers had been made from Bellingham’s Federal Reserve account to two different banks in Poland. Kirchberg was unable to reverse the transfers through the FedLine system. Kirchberg immediately contacted the Federal Reserve and requested reversal of the transfers, but the Federal Reserve refused. The Federal Reserve, however, did contact intermediary institutions to inform them that the transfers were fraudulent, and one of the intermediary institutions was able to reverse one of the transfers. The other fraudulent transfer was not recovered.

Bellingham promptly notified BancInsure of the loss and made a claim under their financial institution bond which provided coverage for losses caused by such things as employee dishonesty and forgery as well as computer system fraud. After an investigation, it was determined that a “Zeus Trojan horse” virus had infected the computer and permitted access to the computer for the fraudulent transfers. BancInsure denied the claim based on several exclusions in the policy including employee-caused loss exclusions, exclusions for theft of confidential information, and exclusions for mechanical breakdown or deterioration of a computer system. In essence, the policy does not cover losses whose proximate cause was employee negligence or a failure to maintain bank computer systems. Bellingham contested the denial and brought suit in federal court for breach of contract.

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Cyber Criminals Don’t Dig Mile Long Tunnels

Digging a tunnel for a mile so that El Chapo could slip into the shaft through his shower and disappear from a high security Mexican prison is something you might expect a Hollywood screenwriter to come up with. Is it any more remarkable though than a cyber-criminal reaching all of the way around the world to try and slip into a bank’s or a customer of the bank’s computer system in order to initiate a wire transfer?

We live at a time when individuals and criminal gangs can reach across oceans and national boundaries to try and initiate unauthorized transfers of funds. Bankers understand that this is a hot topic and that the risk of cyber-fraud is what is currently keeping  regulators awake at night. While a great deal of attention is now being focused on how to keep cyber criminals out of the bank, recent attacks on various public and private institutions illustrates the complexity of denying malefactors access.

In such an environment, bankers look to various risk management strategies including insurance coverage in the event a breach occurs. The first question many banks raise is about their existing insurance coverage Are we already covered under any of the myriad of existing policies we are required to maintain? For example, what about our general liability coverage? While there may be some exceptions, the typical general liability insurance policy that banks have traditionally purchased oftentimes contains an exclusion for losses incurred by data breaches or intrusions to bank networks. If your existing policy does not currently contain such an exclusion it is highly likely that on your next renewal the exclusion will be included. Thus, it is important for bankers to not only understand what their existing policy does or does not cover but also where industry trends are headed.

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