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Jim McAlpin featured on ‘Bank Director’

Due to ongoing changes in the banking industry — from demographic shifts to the drive to digital — it’s never been more important for bank boards to get proactive about strategy. James McAlpin Jr., a partner at Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner and global leader of the firm’s banking practice group, shares his point of view on three key themes explored in the 2021 Governance Best Practices Survey.

  • Taking the Lead on Strategic Discussions
  • Making Meetings More Productive
  • The Three C’s Every Director Should Possess
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BCLP Sponsors Banking Governance Best Practices Survey

Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner was pleased to sponsor the 2021 Governance Best Practices Survey, conducted by Bank Director. BCLP Partner Jim McAlpin worked with Bank Director in framing the questions for the national survey and interpreting the results. Bank Director shared the results May 10, and featured the results in their weekly newsletter, The Slant. An article on the survey and related topics will be published byBank Director this summer.

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Conversations about Banking: An Interview with Greg Morse

This month we continue our “Conversations about Banking” series. The series will consist of video conversations with leaders and influencers in the banking industry about topics of current interest. We hope you will enjoy and find benefit in this new aspect of BankBCLP.

In this session of Conversations about Banking  Jim McAlpin speaks with Greg Morse, CEO of Worthington National Bank in Ft. Worth, Texas. Worthington National is a business oriented bank serving the Ft. Worth and Arlington, Texas communities. Greg is a native Texan who is as comfortable in a saddle as he is in a board room, and his observations about banking are both pragmatic and insightful. During the conversation Greg also describes the community outreach that is at the core of his bank’s culture, including financial literacy education for those in need. Please join us for this enjoyable 25 minute discussion.

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Conversations about Banking: An Interview with Jon Winick

This month we continue our “Conversations about Banking” series. The series will consist of video conversations with leaders and influencers in the banking industry about topics of current interest. We hope you will enjoy and find benefit in this new aspect of BankBCLP.

In this session of Conversations about Banking, Jim McAlpin speaks with Jon Winick, CEO of Chicago based Clark Street Capital. Jon is also the editor and main contributor to the BAN Reports, a widely read banking industry newsletter. During our conversation, Jon shares his candid observations on a wide range of trends and developments impacting the financial services industry. This is a quick paced and entertaining 30 minute video discussion.

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Conversations about Banking: An Interview with Bill Easterlin

This month we continue our “Conversations about Banking” series. The series will consist of video conversations with leaders and influencers in the banking industry about topics of current interest. We hope you will enjoy and find benefit in this new aspect of BankBCLP.

In this second installment of our new “Conversations about Banking” series Banking group partner Jim McAlpin speaks with Bill Easterlin, CEO and President of Queensborough National Bank & Trust Co. Bill is the fourth generation leader of a $1.5 billion family owned bank in eastern Georgia.

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Conversations about Banking: An Interview with Bobby Nix

This month we begin a new series “Conversations about Banking.” The series will consist of video conversations with leaders and influencers in the banking industry about topics of current interest. We hope you will enjoy and find benefit in this new aspect of BankBCLP.

In the first installment of “Conversations about Banking” our partner and Banking practice group leader Jim McAlpin speaks with Philadelphia based entrepreneur Bobby Nix. Mr. Nix has served on the boards of several community banks over the past four decades. As an African American he has a perspective on diversity within banks and bank boards that is timely to hear within our industry. As a successful entrepreneur he is also a champion of the positive impact that community banks can have on small businesses. Mr. Nix currently serves as the chair of the Loan Committee and the ALCO Committee of Hyperion Bank, which has offices in Philadelphia and Atlanta.  

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CFPB Highlights Debt Relief Practices in Student Lending

Student Lending CFPB Enforcement:
Alleging Impermissible Debt Relief Service Advance Fees

Director Kraninger has outlined in various settings, the Bureau’s focus on protecting those often most vulnerable, including the elderly, military personnel and veterans, as well as students, sometimes collectively referred to special populations. Recently, the Bureau took aim at several businesses, which according to the CFPB’s complaint were exploiting students by charging impermissible advance fees in connection with purported debt relief services.  We should expect further activity in 2021 with the change of administration, potential extension of certain COVID-19 pandemic-related student lending forbearance orders, and other potential student lending protection efforts. 

The complaint asserts five causes of action under the Telemarketing and Consumer Fraud and Abuse Prevention Act, 15 U.S.C. §§ 6102(c), 6105(d) (“TCFAPA”); the Telemarketing Sales Rule (“TSR”), 16 C.F.R. pt. 310; and the Consumer Financial Protection Act of 2010 (“CFPA”), 12 U.S.C. §§ 5531, 5536(a), 5564, 5565, in connection with the marketing and sale of debt relief services. According to the complaint, “Defendants Performance SLC, LLC and Performance Settlement, LLC, along with their owner and manager Defendant Daniel Crenshaw, are engaging in debt relief activities that have harmed consumers nationwide by charging illegal advance fees, failing to make required disclosures, and engaging in deceptive sales practices.”

Penalties & Injunctive Relief Requested

In its filing announcement the CFPB stated that “Consumers would pay between $1,000 and $1,450 in fees to PSLC for it to file paperwork with [the U.S. Department of Education], even though student loan borrowers can do this themselves for free.” The Bureau claims “that PSLC had some consumers pay this prohibited upfront fee through high-interest financing from a third party.”  The complaint seeks injunctive relief to prevent the potential on-going violations of the TSR and the CFPA; consumer “monetary relief including but not limited to the refund of monies paid, restitution, disgorgement or compensation for unjust enrichment, and payment of damages;” imposition of civil money penalties against Defendants, and an award of costs to the Bureau. The complaint alleges that “[f]rom 2016 to 2019, PSLC enrolled more than 6,500 customers in multiple states” and that certain “Trust Plan Customers paid more than $4,300,000 in fees to PSLC” and other customers “paid more than $4,900,000 in loan principal and interest” on allegedly improper loans arising from Defendants’ activities.

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2020 Governance Best Practices Survey

2020 Governance Best Practices Survey

October 15, 2020

Authored by: Jim McAlpin

Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner was pleased to partner with Bank Director on their first annual Governance Best Practices Survey. In my work with boards of directors over the years I’ve found that the most effective tool can be reference to what other well run companies are doing. Best practices are important in every industry, but of particular importance in the banking industry. I believe the information in this year’s survey results will be very helpful to bank boards across the U.S.

The survey focused on the areas of process, independence, oversight, composition and refreshment. You will find from reading the survey results that there is a range of approach In the banking industry to certain key aspects of board governance. For example, not all bank boards have executive committees and among those which do there is not a uniform approach to the committee’s functioning. There is also divergence of approach in whether the CEO also serves as the board chair. I tend to think that a lack of uniformity of approach in the industry is healthy. I am skeptical of those who advocate for rigid adherence to “best practices” in board governance but I agree that practices which have been effective for others can serve as a guide. 

Boards are groups of people, and no two groups of people function in the same way. In my experience, the fundamental building block of an effective board Is careful selection of directors to fill roles within a board. It’s not unlike how the best coaches recruit  for talent based on specific needs of the team. Too often I see board rooms with essentially the same director sitting in all of the seats. Differences in business experience, life experience and perspective among directors can greatly benefit the quality of the board’s collective insight and decision making. 

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Crypto Goes Mainstream: OCC Says Banks Can Provide Crypto Custody Services

On Wednesday, July 22, 2020, Acting Comptroller of the Currency Brian Brooks reaffirmed his interest in being seen as an agent of modernization in a letter clarifying the authority of national banks and federal savings associations to provide cryptocurrency services for customers.

The letter from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”) discusses the increasing acceptance of cryptocurrency, and especially Bitcoin, as a method of payment and form of investment. It acknowledges a correlating growing demand for “safe places, such as banks, to hold unique cryptographic keys associated with cryptocurrencies on behalf of customers and to provide related custody services.” Three reasons – a safe way to hold cryptocurrency keys; a secure storage service; and custodian services for assets managed by investment advisors – are cited in the letter as driving the demand for cryptocurrency custody services.

The safekeeping services are described as a modernization of special deposit and safe deposit boxes, falling within “longstanding authorities to engage in safekeeping and custody activities.” Thus, “the authority to provide safekeeping services extends to digital activities and, specifically, that national banks may escrow encryption keys used in connection with digital certificates because a key escrow service is a functional equivalent to physical safekeeping.”

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Can Standards and Voluntary Certification Help Community Banks and Fintechs Grow, Together?

COVID-19 has laid bare the need to have good technological solutions for the systems and services upon which we rely. In the financial sector, perhaps more than many others, the pace of innovation is beholden to regulatory parameters, but there is some optimism that Fintechs can help fill the gap in traditional financial products, especially in emerging markets. As in our in recent post about digital banking modernization by the OCC, regulators are feeling out the interest in certain programs. On Monday, July 20, 2020, the FDIC announced a request for public input on a certification program to “promote the efficient and effective adoption of innovative technologies at FDIC-supervised financial institutions.”

More specifically, the FDIC is seeking input regarding whether the development of relevant standards in connection with a voluntary certification process could be applied to third-party models and whether such standards would allow more financial institutions, particularly community banks, to engage with third parties that provide these models, including Fintechs. Such a voluntary certification program could, in theory, reduce costs of doing business for both the financial institutions and providers of models and permit FDIC supervision resources to be used more efficiently and effectively.

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