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Borrower’s Death Does NOT Automatically Accelerate a Reverse Mortgage

May 14, 2019

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Does the death of the borrower automatically accelerate a reverse mortgage? In a decision that is good news for reverse mortgage lenders, a recent New York appellate court answered no. In Mortgage Solutions v. Fattizzo, _ AD3d_, (2d Dep’t, May 1, 2019), the New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, Second Department, considered whether the statute of limitations for enforcing reverse mortgage loans begins to run upon the death of the borrower. Defendant contended that the foreclosure action, filed August 6, 2014, was time-barred by the six year New York Statute of Limitations because the cause of action accrued on the date the borrower died, February 19, 2008.

The Court focused on the language in the reverse mortgage at issue – “[l]ender may require immediate payment in full of all outstanding principal and accrued interest if …” (emphasis added) – and noted that it confers upon the holder of the note and mortgage the option, but not the obligation, to accelerate payment of the debt. The Court held that an affirmative act by the lender was needed to accelerate the debt.

Accordingly, in New York, absent different language in the mortgage, the death of the borrower does not automatically amount to accrual of a cause of action for purposes of the statute of limitations. This is a departure from prior New York case law, although the same conclusion recently reached under Florida law.

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Statute of Limitations on Reverse Mortgages

January 8, 2019

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In Hayes v. Reverse Mortgage Solutions, Inc., No. 3D17-1603 (Fla. 3d DCA Nov. 21, 2018), a case of first impression, the Florida Third District Court of Appeals considered whether the statute of limitations for enforcing reverse mortgage loans begins on the date the note matures or upon the death of the borrower.

Defendant contended that the foreclosure action, filed in 2014, was time-barred by the Florida statute of limitation because the cause of action accrued on the date the borrower died in 2008, or alternatively, upon the mortgagee’s acceleration of the reverse mortgage when a prior foreclosure action was filed in 2009. Finding that the language in the reverse mortgage at issue (“[l]ender may require immediate payment in full of all sums secured by this Security Instrument if: (i) A Borrower dies …”) confers upon the mortgagee the right, but not the obligation, to accelerate payment of the debt, the Court held acceleration of the debt based on the death of the borrower is optional and therefore does not automatically amount to accrual of the cause for purposes of the statute of limitations.

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Reverse Mortgage Update: New York Law Mandates New Foreclosure Notices and Certificate of Merit

May 18, 2018

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New York has signed into law an amendment redefining a reverse mortgage as a “home loan.” With this amendment, statutory pre-foreclosure ninety day notices (RPAPL 1304) and a “certificate of merit” (CPLR 3012-b) will be required in all New York reverse mortgage foreclosures. Additionally, New York’s foreclosure settlement conference law (CPLR 3408) now incorporates by reference the new “home loan” definition.

The legislation was signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on April 12, 2018 but “shall be deemed to have been in full force and effect on and after April 20, 2017.” However, the pre-foreclosure notice requirement specific to reverse mortgages has an effective date of May 12, 2018.

Under the new legislation, for actions commenced after May 12, 2018, lenders, assignees or servicers are required to provide a pre-foreclosure notice at least 90 days before commencing legal action against the borrower or borrowers at the property address and any other addresses of record. The language of the notice is set by statute.

Although the 90-day waiting period does not apply, or ceases to apply under certain circumstances (i.e. where a borrower no longer occupies the residence as a principal dwelling),the 90 Day Notice is a condition precedent which, if not strictly complied with, may subject a foreclosure action to dismissal. Further, the foreclosing party is required by statute to deliver the notices by first class and certified mail. Relevant case law makes clear that evidencing the proof of mailing may require tracking documentation for first class mail and certified receipts for notices sent by certified mail.

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